City Council Approves Next Step For 11.5 Million Dollar Fiber-To-Home Project

fiber Network Server

Charles City, Iowa  – The Charles City Council has approved the next major step in the city’s multi-million dollar fiber-to-home broadband internet, TV and telephone project.  City Administrator Steve Diers says the next step will cost 380-thousand dollars to craft a business plan and map the project:

 

The city plans on accessing the 12 million dollar project cost as a utility forcing the city to foot the bill at the beginning.  Diers says the project will be paid off quickly in the long run.

 

Ground could be broken as soon as the spring.  Mayor Dean Andrews says the two-three year ongoing discussion will pay off as the project helps spur economic development in the area.

 

The project calls for 332, 640 square feet or roughly 63 miles of fiber optic cable to make it accessible for area homes and businesses.  The city plans to partner with New Hampton to help offset some of the cost.

Other city council notes:

The engineering agreement with SEH for the southwest TIF stormwater improvement project is approved.  The near 50 thousand dollar price tag will help provide storm water runoff issues. The city also budgeted 80 thousand dollars to reconstruct a culvert in the area.

Members also approved funding for the facade for 100 N. Main Street.  Chamber Director Mark Wix said the money will go to new windows and doors, but the windows will match the design of the time period.  The price tag is over 5,400 dollars.

The council also approved the purchase of American-made materials requested by the Federal Highway Administration for a federal recreational trails grant for the reconstruction of the Charlie Western Trail bridge.

The council approved an ordinance rezoned property owned by the Charles City Railway company from general manufacturing to business.  The American Passenger Train History Museum is trying to convert the property at 11th avenue between North Grand and D streets to feature a  building for displays of railroad cars. A public hearing has been set for October 1.